derivative
A *security whose value derives from uncertain or variable underlying conditions. Examples of derivatives include *futures contracts and *options. The underlying conditions that give rise to uncertainty include fluctuations in the *prices of Commodities, Currencies, and Securities. Derivatives are often customized to the requirements of individual investors. The complexity and high *risk of some forms of derivatives require extreme caution from an auditing perspective. Specialist expertise in understanding and assessing the impact of derivatives is often necessary to reach a reliable *audit opinion.

Auditor's dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • derivative — de·riv·a·tive 1 /də ri və tiv/ n: a contract or security that derives its value from that of an underlying asset (as another security) or from the value of a rate (as of interest or currency exchange) or index of asset value (as a stock index) ◇… …   Law dictionary

  • Derivative — De*riv a*tive, a. [L. derivativus: cf. F. d[ e]rivatif.] Obtained by derivation; derived; not radical, original, or fundamental; originating, deduced, or formed from something else; secondary; as, a derivative conveyance; a derivative word. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Derivative — De*riv a*tive, n. 1. That which is derived; anything obtained or deduced from another. [1913 Webster] 2. (Gram.) A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • derivative — [adj] borrowed, transmitted from source acquired, ancestral, caused, cognate, coming from, connate, copied, evolved, hereditary, imitative, inferential, inferred, not original, obtained, plagiaristic, plagiarized, procured, rehashed, secondary,… …   New thesaurus

  • derivative — ► ADJECTIVE 1) chiefly derogatory imitative of the work of another artist, writer, etc. 2) (of a financial product) having a value deriving from an underlying variable asset. ► NOUN 1) something which is derived from another source. 2) a… …   English terms dictionary

  • derivative — [də riv′ə tiv] adj. [ME derivatif < LL derivativus < L derivatus, pp. of derivare: see DERIVE] 1. derived 2. using or taken from other sources; not original 3. of derivation n. 1. something derived 2 …   English World dictionary

  • derivative — early 15c. (adj.); mid 15c. (n.), from M.Fr. dérivatif (15c.), from L.L. derivativus, from pp. stem of L. derivare (see DERIVE (Cf. derive)). Mathematical sense is from 1670s …   Etymology dictionary

  • Derivative — This article is an overview of the term as used in calculus. For a less technical overview of the subject, see Differential calculus. For other uses, see Derivative (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • derivative — Coming from another; taken from something preceding; secondary. That which has not its origin in itself, but owes its existence to something foregoing. Anything obtained or deduced from another @ derivative action A suit by a shareholder to… …   Black's law dictionary

  • derivative — Coming from another; taken from something preceding; secondary. That which has not its origin in itself, but owes its existence to something foregoing. Anything obtained or deduced from another @ derivative action A suit by a shareholder to… …   Black's law dictionary

  • derivative — derivatively, adv. derivativeness, n. /di riv euh tiv/, adj. 1. derived. 2. not original; secondary. n. 3. something derived. 4. Also called derived form. Gram. a form that has undergone derivation from anoth …   Universalium

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